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Rear Admiral Sudarshan Y. Shrikhande , AVSM, IN (Retd)

Rear Admiral Sudarshan Y. Shrikhande , AVSM, IN (Retd)

RADM Shrikhande graduated from the NDA. His qualifications include Masters from the Soviet Naval War College, St Petersburg (1985-88) in ASW and Weapon Engineering; Msc From Staff College(1995), MPhil from the Indian Naval War College and highest distinction from the US Naval War College( 2003). He has served long years at sea, commanded three ships and been defense attaché in Australia and to other South Pacific nations. Ashore he has been commander War Room at NHQ, headed the IN’s Tactical Evaluation Group and was a founding member as a captain of the IN’s Strategy and Operations Council. In flag rank he has been head of Naval Intelligence; Chief of Staff of SNC; Joint HQ staff duties and in the nuclear forces command and Flag Officer Doctrines and Concepts before requesting early retirement in July 2016. As a veteran he continues teaching at several institutions including the NDC, all War colleges and the CDM as well as the NDA and INA spanning strategy, operational art, RMA, Peloponnesian War, Indo-Pacific geopolitics, leadership and ethics. He has participated in Track 1.5 discussions with China and the US and is associated with the Vivekananda International, Observer Research and the National Maritime Foundations, National Security Council Secretariat as well as other institutions.

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Manish singh
Manish singh
2 years ago

Well written article sir. I believe the decision to lower the caliber was also taken first as NATO was moving to 5.56 and what is good for them is good enough for us mentality, secondly we had IPKF and domestic insurgency during the 90’s where the advantage of 5.56 with lower recoil and automatic fire was felt.

Rear Admiral Sudarshan Y. Shrikhande , AVSM, IN (Retd)
Sudarshan Shrikhande
2 years ago

Thank you for the background. While in some ways the 7.62mm will be a good choice, the 5.56 did most of the work well and is still not a bad choice in some ways. What i have surmised is that knowledge of bullets and rifle technologies in combination has not been as good as it should have been. Thus, calibre as a quantification (ie 5.56 versus 7.62) becomes an oversimplified quantitative figure rather than a qualitative issue. Today, with greater detecting, and aiming devices available, the first shot kill probability of 7.62 reduces the subsequent shots’ errors due to recoil.… Read more »

nealis
nealis
2 years ago

Old article, but you make enough good points considering the clamor for a larger calibre round than the 5.56. The 7.62x51mm NATO round that is being proposed is probably not the best round to adopt for assault rifles, considering the limited US experience with the round with the SCAR H in Afghanistan. The SCAR H was found to really too light(yes lighter is always better in some cases) of a platform to used as stable and effective platform as a designated marksmanship rifle, while the caliber offered limited utility over the 5.56 in the assault role. There were real drawbacks… Read more »

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