About the author

Col RN Ghosh Dastidar (Retd)

Col RN Ghosh Dastidar (Retd)

Col RN Ghosh Dastidar is a Post Graduate from Madras University in Defence and Strategic Studies. He is a retired Mechanised Infantry Officer, with a vast and varied experience in the Indian Army of 38 years. He is a keen follower of Geo Strategic events around the Globe and a freelance journalist, in this field.

Read More About: Col RN Ghosh Dastidar (Retd)

12 Comments

  1. 1
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    Col Manobendra Roy

    Good read…well researched and analysis of all aspects particularly the Judiciary-Military tussle…Imran in any case is a puppet…desrves no further emphasis on his status…

    Always been difficult to predict any positive changes in Pakistan…negative predictions always easy though…

    We need a stable democracy to return in Pakistan…which the author is fervently hoping come 2020…and so is the rest of us in India…

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  2. 2
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    Vinod Kumar Sharma

    A well researched article covering the role of judiciary in upholding the civil rights and keeping a check on the unbridled powers of the Pak Armed Forces. It also showcase the prevailing political situation in the country and increasing intervention by the Pak military. A must read article for for all military leaders interested in the happenings in our hostile neighbour.

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    1. 2.1
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      Subhash Ghildiyal

      Pak by default b’cos of its geographical location will continue to have military playing a major role . Karachi , Lahore , Islamabad Rawalpindi aside the country is wild with lack of development , lack of infrastructure . It’s western regions are tribal and not mainstreamed . The army will have to learn going piggyback on pliable leaders like Imran Khan to avoid judicial scrutiny. The country is in the grip of Wahhabism and army role cannot b delegitimised . Pak as of today with Baluch seeking secession & FATA not amicable withPunjabi pak army will not survive without it’s military . The military will keep a low profile but the ignition key will remain in their hands .

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  3. 3
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    Brig Ashit Kumar Biswas, Veteran

    Yes, Year 2020 could be or rather should be the watershed year for Military to be a democratic institution of Pakistan democracy. The judiciary has definitely provided adequate platform to the legislature to rein in the Military to function within the walls of constitutional norms. But the mute question is whether Imran Khan Govt which has come to the power on the props of the Army can bring in or even has the will power to bring in sufficiently strong legislation without any loopholes to really curb the unfettered power of Army. The Army on it’s part who has tasted the blood of military dictatorship since 1958 is really going to turn Vegan so easily and without giving any fight. Well, time will only tell.

    A very well written article. Brings about in a very logical and chronological manner the state of affairs Pakistan is in today and the tussle between judiciary and military going on for quite sometime. A must read for all Indians as anything happening in Pakistan and that too if it has the potential to bring in any fundamental change in its governance is of great importance to India.

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  4. 4
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    Abhishek

    Thank you for writing the article, through reading this it has become clear justice eventually prevails… At the core citizens of both nations share the same value system and similar vices. We are both quick to praise or loathe, and rulers (external or internal) have benefitted from these shortcomings as we are easy to divide basis religion/caste and hence rule.

    This ignites hope that all is not lost to “aam aadmi”.

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  5. 5
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    Air Cmdre HP Singh

    Dear Colonel,
    An excellent and penetrative analysis of the Pakistan’s highest court’s rulings and their likely impact on the military’s role vis-a-vis democratically elected (if at all it can be legitimately called so) Civilian government and their likely impact on the immediate neighbourhood, specially our country. Wish things turn out to be as analysed, anticipated and predicted by you!
    Genuine fears, however, exist whether the Pakistan judiciary will be successful in establishing the constitutional superiority in the country, specially when ‘military selected ‘ P.M. holds the reigns of civil powers in that country at present and willingly dances to their tunes. What happens, if Militarily again takes control, suspending the Constitution,which has happened almost as a routine when democratically elected governments and judiciary pose a danger to Military supremacy in that country?

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  6. 6
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    Col Manobendra

    Good read…well researched and analysis of all aspects particularly the Judiciary-Military tussle…Imran in any case is a puppet…desrves no further emphasis on his status…

    Always been difficult to predict any positive changes in Pakistan…negative predictions always easy though…

    We need a stable democracy to return in Pakistan…which the author is fervently hoping come 2020…and so is the rest of us in India…

    Reply
  7. 7
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    C M BOPANNA

    Beautifully articulated sir. But it still seems a far cry from desired political end state in Pakistan. The deep state will eventually find it’s dark ways to resurrect like a hydra. The military and its intelligence agencies have ensured no truly democratic process comes in to being, lest its authority be challenged and eventually made irrelevant. Unlike India, where the military was, is and will remain an instrument of state policy, Pakistani establishment will find a way to be above the constitution and remain a law unto itself.

    As far as the current despensation against Musharraf is concerned, there is a lobby which wants mohhajirs out. Else why would the response be so meek? Uncharacteristic! While the recent judicial activism acts as a beacon of hope, how it helps retrieve Pakistan from being deemed as a failed state and its transformation into a progressive Islamic democracy is something most political pundits and strategic analysts fail to aver. Simply because there are no historical references to fall back to. Will the military give up its political authority? No.
    Can any civilian government in Pakistan downgrade the status its Army leadership enjoys in parliament ? No, not in the foreseeable future. Will the military junta along with it’s all powerful ISI bow to long term national interest? Unlikely.
    It will be therefore interesting to see how 2020 unfolds in the region. It is no more a secret that US no more holds sway over political decisions in the sub continent. In the Indo Pak context, not at all! In a way we see Dragonfire unfolding in a very different way. And in the Pakistan- China equation, military is more important than the civilian government. Further, when we look at the Indian context in this equation, Pakistan with strong military is in their interest. In the overall gambit, China has already played its move, pawn to king3 !

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  8. 8
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    Ramesh

    Pakistan is not a true Democracy. It’s heartening to see the judiciary emphasising its powers . This may just save the country becoming a failed state . Yes the Pakistan judiciary has sent out a message to the rest of Asia . Well researched article . Clear and precise.

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  9. 9
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    Samarth

    Hope 2020, brings prosperity and peace to a nation riddled with internal problems.
    The judiciary, legislature and military in Pakistan’s case have to work in sync,with the interest of Pakistan in Mind…How long can it depend on Its Military in Today’s diplomatic and fast growing World.
    Rightly qouted”Law is Above all”.

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  10. 10
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    Kapil Dev

    The Article by Col Dastidar encapsulates the dilemma faced by Pakistan along with historical perspective in a very concise and lucid manner. The facade of power in the hands of a civil democratically elected Government of Pakistan doesn’t stand minutest of scrutiny. It is well reflected by the extension of tenure of the current army Chief by as much as three years; a clear case of arm twisting by Bajwa. The well received decision of the Supreme Court of Pakistan to put a stay on the Govt’s decision does provide the Civil Government some leeway in flexing muscle. However, this decision must be seen in the light of tacit collusion of a number of Corps Commanders who were against such an extension.
    The Civilian Government is already moving forward to amend the necessary provisions to put a stamp of legality on its previous decision. The hope that democracy may flourish in its true sense under the watchful eyes of Supreme Court is neither supported by the empirical evidence nor by any action of the current spineless Government.

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  11. 11
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    Shonalee

    Am glad to read this article, so beautifully articulated. Hope that the start of this decade, brings out the best.

    Reply

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